Wayne Thiebaud

These are too pretty for me not to post. In 1961, American painter Wayne Thiebaud exhibited a series of paintings of cakes and candy in New York. The show was well-received, and although some critics would later characterize his work as pop art, he said he painted them out of nostalgia:

My subject matter was a genuine sort of experience that came out of my life, particularly the American world in which I was privileged to be . . . . I would really think of the bakery counters, of the way the counter was lit, where the pies were placed, but I wanted just a piece of the experience. From when I worked in restaurants . . . [it was] always poetic to me.

The sixties were a fruitful (ha!) time for bands named after food, and also for food paintings it seems.

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1 Comment

  1. kloknyc

     /  February 2, 2012

    I share Thiebaud’s sentiments in the presentation of pastries and baked goods. I search out NYC bakery boutiques with soft, inviting lighting with perfectly placed pleasant pastries. The grandeur of it all is art, sweet, inviting, comforting. Pastries are social objects, being grouped together appears as though a natural and instinctive state. Their place is a comforting representation of abundance and indulgence..a comfort that those of us socialized with ‘sweetness’ seek out for solace, celebration and just or simple connection with the everyday.

    When one comes across the bakery counter with lone pastries, ill-lighting and or ill-thought presentation the invitation and comfort of is lost. The lone pastry appears sad, neglected and the grandeur of baking and comfort it often ensues seems forgotten, as does my desire, dare I say, need to consume it.

    Reply

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